...to stand on the meeting of two eternities, the past and future, which is precisely the present moment; to toe that line. -H D Thoreau

We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be
to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. -
T. S. Eliot

14.9.09


















A whirring slowed down to the recognizable slapping of playing cards stuck in bike spokes and then stopped at the studio door. 'Drew's head pears around,
“I need a one of those puppets on strings of an old man that I can make walk and close one eye to wink, and I need him dressed in black, with big funny clown shoes on. Do you have one of those?”
“No, but I have a Chinese dog parade head with closing eye lids and a yak beard.”
“Oh, that will be perfect!”

Dexterity or Deceptiveness.
Sleight of Hand is often used in close-up magic. It makes use of simple everyday props, such as cards and coins. The guiding principle is ‘be natural.’ A well-performed sleight looks like an ordinary, natural and completely innocent gesture.

The hand is quicker than the eye is usually not the case. Along with manual dexterity, sleight-of-hand depends on the use of psychology, misdirection, and natural choreography to accomplish a magical effect. Misdirection is perhaps the most important component to the art of sleight-of-hand. The magician choreographs his actions so that the spectator will look where he wants them to. More importantly, they do not look where the performer does not wish them to look.
Two types of misdirection are time and movement.
Time is simple; by allowing a small amount of time to pass after an action, events are skewed in the viewer's mind.
Movement is a little more complicated. A phrase often used is "a larger action covers a smaller action." Careful not make the larger action so big that it becomes suspicious.
This is worth more study...

I'm Going to Act Like I Don't Know What's Going On.

12 comments:

  1. ...as every Politician knows.......!

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  2. Hi Jayne, wonderful world of imagination.

    I liked very much your job and your presentations .
    Congratulations .
    A kiss .

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  3. Is a larger action being used here to cover a smaller action? Not sure : I'm amazed, I'm confused, I'm bemused : which is exactly what you wanted.

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  4. A Chinese dog parade head is always perfect.

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  5. ...still laughing at tony's comment( grins )...and now you've got me looking over there, when I should be looking here, wot? Argh!

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  6. bewitched, bothered and bewildered...time to go and play the saxophone and stop thinking about the whirled

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  7. ok, i am unsure where i am looking now....misdirected?

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  8. I must just be stupid! LMAO!!!

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  9. Very interesting. We always wonder - how'd he do that?

    Thanks for stopping by my blog.

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  10. Chinese dog with a Yak beard? That must have been an interesting interlude!

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  11. this one always works:
    "Look over there, the Goodyear Blimp!"

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